宇宙系プログラマと看護師夫婦の情報発信チャンネル

mikazukiblog

生活

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その4【おすすめ無料英語教材】

更新日:

その1、その2、その3に引き続き、オバマ元大統領の大統領候補の指名受諾演説の和訳をしていきます。

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その1【受験勉強にもおすすめ】

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その2【おすすめ無料英語教材】

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その3【おすすめ無料英語教材】

読んでない方は、上記を読んでから以下を読んでみましょう。

動画を再度掲載します。

まずは再生しながら下の英文や和訳を目で追っていきましょう。



オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その4

前回の続き、32:36から開始します。

動画もその時間まで飛ばしてくださいね。

 

7(32:36~41:51)

As commander in chief, I will never hesitate to defend this nation, but I will only send our troops into harm's way with a clear mission and a sacred commitment to give them the equipment they need in battle and the care and benefits they deserve when they come home.

全軍の最高司令官として、私はこの国を守るために決して躊躇などしない。しかし私が米軍を危険な敵地に派遣するのは、目的が明確な場合だけだ。戦闘で必要な機材を必ず提供し、帰国した兵には必ずふさわしいケアと手当を提供すると、揺るぎなく誓っていなければ、決して米兵を派遣したりしない。

I will end this war in Iraq responsibly, and finish the fight against al-Qaida and the Taliban in Afghanistan. I will rebuild our military to meet future conflicts. But I will also renew the tough, direct diplomacy that can prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons and curb Russian aggression.

私は責任をもってイラクでの戦争を終わらせます。そしてアフガニスタンのアルカイダやタリバンとの戦いも終わりです。私は我々の軍を未来の紛争のために再建する。しかし、私はまた、頑強で直接外交を刷新し、イランの核兵器化の獲得を防ぎ、ロシアからの攻撃を抑制する。

I will build new partnerships to defeat the threats of the 21st century: terrorism and nuclear proliferation; poverty and genocide; climate change and disease. And I will restore our moral standing, so that America is once again that last, best hope for all who are called to the cause of freedom, who long for lives of peace, and who yearn for a better future.

私は21世紀の脅威を打ち負かすための新しいパートナーシップをつくる。それはテロリズムや核拡散、貧困や虐殺、気候変動や疫病のようなものに対するものだ。

These are the policies I will pursue. And in the weeks ahead, I look forward to debating them with John McCain.

これらが私の追い求める政策だ。そして今週には、私はマケイン氏とそれらを討論することを楽しみにしている。

But what I will not do is suggest that the senator takes his positions for political purposes. Because one of the things that we have to change in our politics is the idea that people cannot disagree without challenging* each other's character and patriotism.

しかし、マケイン氏には政治目的をかなえるために特定の立場をとったりしてほしくない。たとえ相手の政策に賛成できなくても、相手の人格や愛国心を攻撃する必要はないのです。アメリカの政治においてこの点は変えなくてはならない。

The times are too serious, the stakes are too high for this same partisan playbook. So let us agree that patriotism has no party. I love this country, and so do you, and so does John McCain. The men and women who serve in our battlefields may be Democrats and Republicans and independents, but they have fought together and bled together and some died together under the same proud flag. They have not served a red America or a blue America – they have served the United States of America.

党派対立のルールブックに沿ってこの選挙戦を戦っている余裕はない。今のこの時代、事態はあまりにも深刻で、問われているものはあまりにも重大だからです。なので、愛国心に政党は関係ないと、ここで同意しておきましょう。私はこの国を愛している。皆さんもそうだ。そしてジョン・マケインもこの国を愛しているのです。戦場でこの国のために戦う兵士たちは、男でも女でも、民主党支持者かもしれないし共和党支持者かもしれないし、無党派かもしれない。それでも兵士たちは共に戦い、共に血を流し、同じ誇らしい旗の下で共に死んでいった者たちもいる。兵士たちが我が身を捧げたのは、赤いアメリカでもなければ青いアメリカでもない。彼らはアメリカ合衆国に身を捧げたのです。

So I've got news for you, John McCain. We all put our country first.

なのでマケインさん、お知らせがあります。我々はみな国を一番に考えています。

America, our work will not be easy. The challenges we face require tough choices, and Democrats as well as Republicans will need to cast off the worn-out ideas and politics of the past. For part of what has been lost these past eight years can't just be measured by lost wages or bigger trade deficits. What has also been lost is our sense of common purpose — our sense of higher purpose. And that's what we have to restore.

アメリカでの我々の仕事は楽ではない。その我々が直面している困難には、タフな選択が必要だ。そして民主党員も共和党員も過去の使い古された考えや政策を捨て去る必要があるだろう。過去8年間で失われたものの中には、給料削減や貿易赤字の拡大など数字だけでは測れないものがある。8年間で失われてしまったのは、みんなで一緒に抱く、共通の目的意識です。私たちはそれを復活させなくてはならない。

We may not agree on abortion, but surely we can agree on reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies in this country. The reality of gun ownership may be different for hunters in rural Ohio than for those plagued by gang violence in Cleveland, but don't tell me we can't uphold the Second Amendment while keeping AK-47s out of the hands of criminals.

中絶については意見がいろいろあっても、望まない妊娠の数を減らすべきだと、その点については合意できるはずだ。銃を持つというのが実際にどういうことか。オハイオ農村部のハンターと、クリーブランドの都会でギャング暴力に苦しむ市民では、立場がまるで違うだろう。だからといって、憲法修正第2条の権利を守りつつ、AK47が犯罪者の手に渡らないようにするのが無理なわけはない。

I know there are differences on same-sex marriage, but surely we can agree that our gay and lesbian brothers and sisters deserve to visit the person they love in the hospital and to live lives free of discrimination. Passions fly on immigration, but I don't know anyone who benefits when a mother is separated from her infant child or an employer undercuts American wages by hiring illegal workers. This too is part of America's promise — the promise of a democracy where we can find the strength and grace to bridge divides and unite in common effort.

同性結婚についても様々な意見があるのは知っています。けれども、ゲイやレズビアンの友人たちは愛する人の病室に入れてもらうべきだし、差別されずに生活する権利があると、それくらいはみんな賛成できるはずです。皆さん、移民の扱いについては感情的になりがちですが、母親を幼い子供から引き離して一体誰が得するというのでしょう。あるいは不法移民を雇ってアメリカ人の給料を下げたところで、誰が得するのでしょう。けれどもこうしたこともまた、アメリカの約束の一部なのです。ともに努力し一致団結して分裂を乗り越えるよう、互いに力と思いやりを見出すことも、民主主義の約束なのです。

I know there are those who dismiss such beliefs as happy talk. They claim that our insistence on something larger, something firmer and more honest in our public life is just a Trojan horse for higher taxes and the abandonment of traditional values. And that's to be expected. Because if you don't have any fresh ideas, then you use stale tactics to scare the voters. If you don't have a record to run on, then you paint your opponent as someone people should run from.

こういう信念を、お気楽な楽観主義だと一蹴する人たちがいるのは分かっています。公の生活には今よりもっと大きなものがある、もっと確かでもっと正直なものがある、なくてはならないという私たちの信念は、ただ単に増税と伝統的価値観の放棄を押し通すために私たちが持ち出す、トロイの木馬に過ぎないと。そういう人たちがいるのは、もう織り込み済みです。なぜなら、自分に新鮮なアイディアがないのなら、有権者を怖がらせるために古くさい手法を駆使するしかないからです。もしも自分に実績がないなら、自分の対抗馬を悪く言うというのが、古くさい戦い方だからです。

You make a big election about small things.

大きな大事な選挙を、小さなつまらないレベルの争いにしてしまえばいいのです。

And you know what — it's worked before. Because it feeds into the cynicism we all have about government. When Washington doesn't work, all its promises seem empty. If your hopes have been dashed again and again, then it's best to stop hoping, and settle for what you already know.

そして今まではそれで勝てたわけです。政府に対してそもそも国民が抱えているシニシズムに、うまく合致するから。ワシントンがうまく機能しないとき、どんな約束も空っぽに思える。何度も何度も希望が打ち砕かれてきたのだから、もう希望するのをやめて手元にあるものだけで良しとした方がいいと。そういう考え方で、通用してきたのです。

I get it. I realize that I am not the likeliest candidate for this office. I don't fit the typical pedigree, and I haven't spent my career in the halls of Washington.

わかりますよ。自分が大統領という役職にピッタリふさわしい人間でないことは、よく分かります。大統領にふさわしいとされてきた典型的な経歴はないし、ずっとワシントンで働いて来たわけでもない。

But I stand before you tonight because all across America something is stirring. What the naysayers don't understand is that this election has never been about me. It's been about you.

けれども私はいまこうやって今夜、みなさんの前に立っている。なぜならアメリカのあちこちで今、なにかがうごめいているから。何もかも否定して冷笑しようという連中には理解できないでしょうが、この選挙の主役は私ではない。私だったことは一度もない。この選挙の主役はみなさんです。この選挙は、みなさんの選挙なのです。

For 18 long months, you have stood up, one by one, and said enough to the politics of the past. You understand that in this election, the greatest risk we can take is to try the same old politics with the same old players and expect a different result.

18カ月の長きにわたり、皆さんはひとりひとり立ち上がって、古い政治に「もうたくさんだ」と告げた。この選挙において何より危険なのは、古臭い見慣れた登場人物が仕切る、古臭いいつも通りの政治を選んでしまうこと。いつもと同じものを選んだのに、何かが変わるかもしれないと期待してしまうことです。

You have shown what history teaches us — that at defining moments like this one, the change we need doesn't come from Washington. Change comes to Washington. Change happens because the American people demand it — because they rise up and insist on new ideas and new leadership, a new politics for a new time.

あなた方は歴史は、まさにこのような瞬間に、我々が必要とする変革はワシントンからはやってこないということを教えるということを示してきた。変革はワシントンへと訪れるのです。変化はアメリカ人たちが要求したから起きるのだ。そして立ち上がり、新しい考えやリーダーシップ、新しい時のための新しい政策を求めることによって生まれるのです。

America, this is one of those moments.

アメリカはその瞬間に瀕している。

I believe that as hard as it will be, the change we need is coming. Because I've seen it. Because I've lived it. I've seen it in Illinois, when we provided health care to more children and moved more families from welfare to work. I've seen it in Washington, when we worked across party lines to open up government and hold lobbyists more accountable, to give better care for our veterans and keep nuclear weapons out of terrorist hands.

私はそれが困難であるとしても、必要とする変革が訪れているのだと信じています。なぜなら私はそれを見てきたからだ。私はそれをイリノイ州で、その一端をみたからです。前よりも多くの子供が医療保険を受けられるようになり、前よりも多くの家庭が生活保護を脱して働けるようになった。ワシントンでもその一端を見ました。私たちは政党の壁を越えて、政府の情報公開を促進し、ロビイストの説明責任をより重く問うことに成功しました。政党の壁を越えて、帰還兵や退役軍人の待遇を改善し、テロリストに核兵器が渡らないよう対策を強化した。

And I've seen it in this campaign. In the young people who voted for the first time, and in those who got involved again after a very long time. In the Republicans who never thought they'd pick up a Democratic ballot, but did.

そしてこの選挙でも私は見てきた。若者たちが初めて投票をした姿に。そして長い空白を経て再び政治に参加しようと思い立った姿に。自分が民主党候補を支持するなど思っても見なかった共和党員の姿に。

I've seen it in the workers who would rather cut their hours back a day than see their friends lose their jobs, in the soldiers who re-enlist after losing a limb, in the good neighbors who take a stranger in when a hurricane strikes and the floodwaters rise.

変化の一端は、仲間が失業しないよう自分の働く時間数を犠牲にする労働者の姿にも、垣間見えます。時間を減らして収入を減らすよゆうなどないのに、彼らは仲間のためにそうするのです。あるいは腕や脚を失っても尚、再志願する兵士の姿にも。あるいはハリケーンと洪水に街が襲われたとき、見知らぬ他人を自分の家に迎え入れる善き隣人の姿にも、わたしは変化の一端を見るのです。

8(41:52~最後)

This country of ours has more wealth than any nation, but that's not what makes us rich. We have the most powerful military on Earth, but that's not what makes us strong. Our universities and our culture are the envy of the world, but that's not what keeps the world coming to our shores.

みなさん、私たちのこの国は、ほかのどの国よりも裕福な国です。けれどもこの国の豊かさは、そういうことではありません。この国は地上最強の軍隊を持っているが、アメリカの強さとはそういうことではないのです。この国の大学やこの国の文化は、世界中の憧れです。けれども世界中がいつまでもアメリカにやってくるのは、それが理由ではないのです。

Instead, it is that American spirit — that American promise — that pushes us forward even when the path is uncertain; that binds us together in spite of our differences; that makes us fix our eye not on what is seen, but what is unseen, that better place around the bend.

代わりに、それはアメリカの精神です。アメリカの約束です。それは我々をたとえ行く先が不鮮明だとしても前に押してくれる。我々の多様性にもかかわらず共に結束させてくれる。それは我々の目に映るものではない、見えない曲がり角の向こうにあるより良い場所を求める精神なのです。

That promise is our greatest inheritance. It's a promise I make to my daughters when I tuck them in at night, and a promise that you make to yours — a promise that has led immigrants to cross oceans and pioneers to travel west; a promise that led workers to picket lines, and women to reach for the ballot.

その約束は最高の遺産なのです。その約束は娘たちにお休みを言うとき、そして皆さんが子供たちにお休みを言うとき、する約束です。その約束のために、移民は海を渡り、開拓者は西を目指した。その約束ゆえに労働者はストを決行し、女性は投票権を求めたのです。

And it is that promise that 45 years ago today brought Americans from every corner of this land to stand together on a mall in Washington, before Lincoln's Memorial, and hear a young preacher from Georgia speak of his dream.

そして45年前の今日この日、その約束のために国のあちこちから大勢が集り、ワシントンへと向かったのです。その約束のために人々は一緒になってリンカーン記念館の前に立ち、ジョージア出身の若い牧師が自分の夢について語るのを聞いたのです。

The men and women who gathered there could've heard many things. They could've heard words of anger and discord. They could've been told to succumb to the fear and frustration of so many dreams deferred.

そこに集まった男女は多くのことを聞き得た。怒りと分裂の言葉が響いてもおかしくはなかった。あまりにもたくさんの夢が打ち砕かれてきた不満と、恐怖に屈してしまうよう、呼びかけてもおかしくはなかった。

But what the people heard instead — people of every creed and color, from every walk of life — is that in America, our destiny is inextricably linked. That together, our dreams can be one.

しかし、人々は代わりに、あらゆる信条と人種の、あらゆる立場の人々が聞いた言葉は、アメリカにおいて私たちみんなの運命は解きようがないほど深く結びついているのだと、そういう言葉でした。みんなが一緒になれば、みんなの夢も1つになれるのだと。

"We cannot walk alone," the preacher cried. "And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back."

「ひとりでは歩けない」と牧師は叫んだ。「みんなで歩いていく今、 誓わなくてはならない。私たちは常に、前へ前へ行進するのだと。決して後ろを振り向かないのだと」

America, we cannot turn back. Not with so much work to be done. Not with so many children to educate, and so many veterans to care for. Not with an economy to fix and cities to rebuild and farms to save. Not with so many families to protect and so many lives to mend.

アメリカは、我々は後戻りはしない。すべき仕事がたくさんある。こんなにも多くの子供たちに教育を与えて、こんなにも多くの帰還兵を助けなくてはならないのですから。経済を直し、都市を修復し、農村を救わなくてはならないのですから。こんなにたくさんの家庭を守り、こんなに大勢の生活を立て直さなくてはならないのですから。

America, we cannot turn back. We cannot walk alone. At this moment, in this election, we must pledge once more to march into the future. Let us keep that promise — that American promise — and in the words of Scripture hold firmly, without wavering, to the hope that we confess.

アメリカは、我々は後戻りはしない。我々は一人では歩けない。この瞬間、この選挙で、我々は未来に向けて行進すると、今一度宣誓しなければならない。その約束を守りましょう。そのアメリカの約束を。そして聖書にもあるように、揺らぐことなく、告白した希望をかたく抱き続けましょう。

Thank you, God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.

ありがとう。神の祝福がありますように。そして神がアメリカ合衆国を祝福されますように。

今回はここまで



 

長かった演説の和訳もこの第4回で終了です。

ありがとうございました。

↓過去回は以下↓

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その1【受験勉強にもおすすめ】

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その2【おすすめ無料英語教材】

オバマ元大統領の演説(2008/8/28)全文和訳その3【おすすめ無料英語教材】

↓過去の他の演説解説は以下↓

無料英語教材オバマの演説動画解説(前編)【 和訳とポイント解説 】

無料英語教材オバマの演説動画解説(後編)【 和訳とポイント解説 】

 

 

プログラミングスクール

AIのスクール

-生活

Copyright© mikazukiblog , 2022 All Rights Reserved Powered by STINGER.